Anonymous said: Wait a minute. Don't fucking tell me you're on the Up Hate Train. ***Don't fucking tell me you're on the Up Hate Train.***

What?

2 notes

the-wolfbats:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"Ratatouille is my favorite film of all time, and I feel like it often gets overshadowed by some of the more popular Pixar films. It’s well written, well animated, the music is great, the characters are all likable, and it has an incredible atmosphere. My favorite scenes are too many to count, but the ending with Anton Ego’s review sticks in my mind the most. I wish I saw people talking about this more often because, while it may not be entirely perfect, I think it deserves a ton of praise."

I think it’s more adult than just about anything in the Pixar lineup (No, the first six minutes of UP do not negate a flying house, a very old man who looks 50, or talking dogs) and that makes people not think of it in quite the same way.
They don’t know how to think about it, so they leave it alone. Which is terrible because I think this is the best in the lineup.

the-wolfbats:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"Ratatouille is my favorite film of all time, and I feel like it often gets overshadowed by some of the more popular Pixar films. It’s well written, well animated, the music is great, the characters are all likable, and it has an incredible atmosphere. My favorite scenes are too many to count, but the ending with Anton Ego’s review sticks in my mind the most. I wish I saw people talking about this more often because, while it may not be entirely perfect, I think it deserves a ton of praise."

I think it’s more adult than just about anything in the Pixar lineup (No, the first six minutes of UP do not negate a flying house, a very old man who looks 50, or talking dogs) and that makes people not think of it in quite the same way.

They don’t know how to think about it, so they leave it alone. Which is terrible because I think this is the best in the lineup.

211 notes

postracialcomments:

cyb3ranthy:

ladyluna13:

chantillylacewithaprettyface:

blasianxbri:

amicuzzo:

lilyvalli:

White people already have true #diversity. 

Lmao this is hilarious cus blue and green eyes are highly recessive genes while brown eyes are dominant so like ur genetic diversity off of a phenotype that was probably spawned from inbreeding doesn’t seem like a great idea but I doubt white supremacists are bothered by that seeing how it’s probably how they themselves born lol.

some white people have been REACHING lately.

Lol I’m cackling

Lmao like what

White people never cease to amaze me.

This is funny cuz…..
This is my pops

His eyes switch between Green, gray and Blue
and this is my niece

Her eyes are green
They are both 100% Black
LMFAO “true” diversity

Reblogging because this is relevant to mod ren’s addressing of this confession.

postracialcomments:

cyb3ranthy:

ladyluna13:

chantillylacewithaprettyface:

blasianxbri:

amicuzzo:

lilyvalli:

White people already have true #diversity. 

Lmao this is hilarious cus blue and green eyes are highly recessive genes while brown eyes are dominant so like ur genetic diversity off of a phenotype that was probably spawned from inbreeding doesn’t seem like a great idea but I doubt white supremacists are bothered by that seeing how it’s probably how they themselves born lol.

some white people have been REACHING lately.

Lol I’m cackling

Lmao like what

White people never cease to amaze me.

This is funny cuz…..

This is my pops

His eyes switch between Green, gray and Blue

and this is my niece

Her eyes are green

They are both 100% Black

LMFAO “true” diversity

Reblogging because this is relevant to mod ren’s addressing of this confession.

4,884 notes

no26-kaichu:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

junawashere:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

mich-quiche:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"I was so excited for Brave from the promotional materials. Yay, badass princess on a horse! Yay, badass princess with a bow and arrow! Yay, badass princess who doesn’t get with a dude! It was marketed as an adventure, and instead we got SAPPY MOTHER-DAUGHTER BONDING. Which is fine, but I don’t care about sappy mother-daughter bonding. I wanted a princess kicking ass, and instead I got a whiny brat. I’ve never been more disappointed in a Disney or Pixar film"

Trailers lie. Get over it.
While Brave wasn’t what many expected, it was still valuable. We get Pixar’s first female protagonist: a company that prioritizes story and character has prioritized toys, fish, and robots before a woman. We get a mother-daughter bonding story which is rare in mainstream media as well as animation. We don’t get many narratives where women’s relationships are seen as valuable; the “sappy” mother-daughter bonding is nothing to scoff at. Not to mention it being a narrative where the main character has to take responsibility for their poor decisions as well as having to live up to their responsibilities.
Now, Brave is nowhere near perfect; it’s got its narrative problems as well as having some missed opportunities. But just because you don’t see the value in it doesn’t mean that it isn’t worth watching.

My main problem with Brave’s trailer vs. movie wasn’t the mother-daughter bond, it was the COMPLETE butchering of the tone that it was trying to market. The first few teasers and trailers were showing this mystical, mysterious world full of adventure and magic and (at least I was expecting) possibly dark themes that Pixar can pull off, cause the’ve done it before. Instead, the majority of the movie was silly and fast-paces with a plot that way threadbare and depended on Merida’s absolute stupidity (“I want to change my mom” being the vaguest, most easy-to-interpret phrase she could have possibly said, and everyone in the audience knew that fixing the tapestry was not how the spell was going to break). They tried to include dark, mysterious scenes but they didn’t fit in at all with the movie as a whole, and the “villain” (Mor’du) was….just a bear. No motivation, he just showed up all angry and scary when the climax demanded it.
Basically, my problem is not with the relationships between the characters, but the fact that we could have had a fantasy epic that instead turned into a mess of a movie with no consistency or plot strength. I could go on for a long, long time about how disappointed I was with Brave.

Like I said before, trailers lie. I could tell watching the trailer and clips that they were hiding a lot of the actual story and I can see why. Had they tried to market this movie on the mother-daughter, do you honestly think that people would have gone to see this? Female narratives are very pigeonholed and are given unfair bias by the public. I honestly don’t blame them for manipulating the audience with the trailer they made.
Mor’du isn’t just a bear: several times in the film he serves as Merida’s lesson of why she must change. In the first instance, it’s when Elinor tries to use the story of the ambitious son to teach Merida why duty and responsibility is important. Now, I will agree that Mor’du is more of a MacGuffin rather than a full-fledged villain, but his presence still serves a purpose in the story other than just being scary. 
I would ultimately blame Brave’s narrative problems on a lot of the behind-the-scenes drama. Brenda Chapman, the original director and creator of the movie was removed from the production as it’s director over creative disputes. The story really feels like it went through a couple hands before its completion. As I stated before, while Brave was not what we expected, but we still got some valuable things out of it.

"Trailers lie. Get over it." really? this is the dumbest excuse for a awful movie, the problem isn’t the mother-daughter story, is the terrible way they develop everything, for example the time when merida kicked everyone asses and won her own hand, when i saw this i was OMG!!!  a bunch of hairy men, they are going nuts! a little girl won!!!! …but instead no reaction, NO REACTION, i wanted to watch fighting, danger, darkness, just because is a mother-daughter movie don’t mean soft girly plain boring, the only thing brave about this was release the movie

That’s not an excuse; it’s a fact. Trailers are manufactured to get people to see the movie: they don’t always tell the truth about what’s in it. And, I’m not excusing away the movie’s problems; I’m talking about how the trailer is misleading considering the movie’s real content.
And there was a reaction to Merida’s “shooting for her own hand”: a possible war. Merida’s refusal to pick a suitor is the whole point of the men fighting in this movie (as well as some old rivalries on their part). Also, going back to my original point of trailers lie, when that clip was first released, it was presented out of context, leading the audience to believe this was another story about the empowerment of a young woman: that was a deception.

So you don’t think it’s at all problematic that this specific movie got such vague, obviously tailored advertising? Because I’m going to have to disagree. Before the New Renaissance, as people like to call it, Disney/Pixar’s trailers were perfectly honest about what their movie was going to be about. I fact, most of them explicitly told the audience what the plot line was, usually by voiceover. They were open about the fact that they were writing musicals (when this applied), they didn’t shy from who the protagonist was, and they were never, ever vague. Even Frozen’s trailer, which focused on humor and action, still explicitly stated what the movie was about. The same could be said for Tangled and The Princess and the Frog, the former of which saw a lot of similar criticism (especially since it did focus so much on Flynn).
So now let’s talk about Brave. It came with a set of trailers that, at their most informative, go past being action-centered to painting Merida as a hero; go out of the way to imply that a war was coming; focus on a witch that shows up for one scene; and give the audience a taste of a world beyond a castle that takes up half of the movie. Say what you want about movies in general, but this is an important change in Disney’s advertising that shouldn’t go ignored. It represents an epitomized realization of Disney’s tactics which now focus specifically on selling to boys, which are apparently the more important demographic now. And unlike Tangled? It wasn’t even backed up with a good movie.
You have to ask yourself why Pixar felt the need to cover up this specific movie’s plot. Why is it that now that we have girls in the leading role, we suddenly need to keep the plot line a secret entirely? You actually said it: because stories centering around women and only women aren’t seen as valuable. It’s consistently seen as a “niche market” and shoved to the side to be straight-to-DVD films. But this is not an excuse. It shows a lack of faith in their own movie, for one, but more importantly it is cowardice. They had so little faith in a female-driven story that they covered it up entirely. They hid it behind the story of a movie that seemed much more interesting to watch. 
So I think OP and everyone else who cared had every right to be disappointed. Because a kick-ass princess saving the world? That would have been bad-ass to watch. But instead we got the same old, tired, faux-feminist story about how women should be allowed to marry when they’re ready and how you shouldn’t take your family for granted. That’s not just ‘trailer vagueness’. That’s outright deceit from a company we’d previously been able to trust.

I never said that it wasn’t problematic: only a reality of the industry. Brave is not the only movie that this has been done to: there are several trailer that mislead the audience purposely in order to sell the product as generally as possible. We’ve discussed before the effects of niche marketing and how it can be harmful, so it’s not that I’m unaware of the issue. In Brave’s case, I could tell that what was being shown wasn’t all that there was to the movie: beware of trailers that just show scenes with voice over rather than a short rundown of the basic narrative. 
Maybe it’s because I wasn’t at all surprised that the movie wasn’t what was shown in the trailer. I’m not saying that they didn’t have a right to be disappointed: I actually take umbridge at their comments on the mother-daughter relationship more than anything else. I wouldn’t call Brave a faux-feminist story by any means (at least compared to Maleficent), but that’s just my opinion. It’s more about getting out of your own way and seeing that your actions have consequence rather than another narrative about a young girl not wanting to get married.
But to my original point: the deception is nothing new, so I really am not going to hold it against the film. I am in no way denying that Brave is a film that’s lacking in it’s narrative. But at the same time, I’m not going to throw it out completely because of a deceptive trailer.

no26-kaichu:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

junawashere:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

mich-quiche:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"I was so excited for Brave from the promotional materials. Yay, badass princess on a horse! Yay, badass princess with a bow and arrow! Yay, badass princess who doesn’t get with a dude! It was marketed as an adventure, and instead we got SAPPY MOTHER-DAUGHTER BONDING. Which is fine, but I don’t care about sappy mother-daughter bonding. I wanted a princess kicking ass, and instead I got a whiny brat. I’ve never been more disappointed in a Disney or Pixar film"

Trailers lie. Get over it.

While Brave wasn’t what many expected, it was still valuable. We get Pixar’s first female protagonist: a company that prioritizes story and character has prioritized toys, fish, and robots before a woman. We get a mother-daughter bonding story which is rare in mainstream media as well as animation. We don’t get many narratives where women’s relationships are seen as valuable; the “sappy” mother-daughter bonding is nothing to scoff at. Not to mention it being a narrative where the main character has to take responsibility for their poor decisions as well as having to live up to their responsibilities.

Now, Brave is nowhere near perfect; it’s got its narrative problems as well as having some missed opportunities. But just because you don’t see the value in it doesn’t mean that it isn’t worth watching.

My main problem with Brave’s trailer vs. movie wasn’t the mother-daughter bond, it was the COMPLETE butchering of the tone that it was trying to market. The first few teasers and trailers were showing this mystical, mysterious world full of adventure and magic and (at least I was expecting) possibly dark themes that Pixar can pull off, cause the’ve done it before. Instead, the majority of the movie was silly and fast-paces with a plot that way threadbare and depended on Merida’s absolute stupidity (“I want to change my mom” being the vaguest, most easy-to-interpret phrase she could have possibly said, and everyone in the audience knew that fixing the tapestry was not how the spell was going to break). They tried to include dark, mysterious scenes but they didn’t fit in at all with the movie as a whole, and the “villain” (Mor’du) was….just a bear. No motivation, he just showed up all angry and scary when the climax demanded it.

Basically, my problem is not with the relationships between the characters, but the fact that we could have had a fantasy epic that instead turned into a mess of a movie with no consistency or plot strength. I could go on for a long, long time about how disappointed I was with Brave.

Like I said before, trailers lie. I could tell watching the trailer and clips that they were hiding a lot of the actual story and I can see why. Had they tried to market this movie on the mother-daughter, do you honestly think that people would have gone to see this? Female narratives are very pigeonholed and are given unfair bias by the public. I honestly don’t blame them for manipulating the audience with the trailer they made.

Mor’du isn’t just a bear: several times in the film he serves as Merida’s lesson of why she must change. In the first instance, it’s when Elinor tries to use the story of the ambitious son to teach Merida why duty and responsibility is important. Now, I will agree that Mor’du is more of a MacGuffin rather than a full-fledged villain, but his presence still serves a purpose in the story other than just being scary. 

I would ultimately blame Brave’s narrative problems on a lot of the behind-the-scenes drama. Brenda Chapman, the original director and creator of the movie was removed from the production as it’s director over creative disputes. The story really feels like it went through a couple hands before its completion. As I stated before, while Brave was not what we expected, but we still got some valuable things out of it.

"Trailers lie. Get over it." really? this is the dumbest excuse for a awful movie, the problem isn’t the mother-daughter story, is the terrible way they develop everything, for example the time when merida kicked everyone asses and won her own hand, when i saw this i was OMG!!!  a bunch of hairy men, they are going nuts! a little girl won!!!! …but instead no reaction, NO REACTION, i wanted to watch fighting, danger, darkness, just because is a mother-daughter movie don’t mean soft girly plain boring, the only thing brave about this was release the movie

That’s not an excuse; it’s a fact. Trailers are manufactured to get people to see the movie: they don’t always tell the truth about what’s in it. And, I’m not excusing away the movie’s problems; I’m talking about how the trailer is misleading considering the movie’s real content.

And there was a reaction to Merida’s “shooting for her own hand”: a possible war. Merida’s refusal to pick a suitor is the whole point of the men fighting in this movie (as well as some old rivalries on their part). Also, going back to my original point of trailers lie, when that clip was first released, it was presented out of context, leading the audience to believe this was another story about the empowerment of a young woman: that was a deception.

So you don’t think it’s at all problematic that this specific movie got such vague, obviously tailored advertising? Because I’m going to have to disagree. Before the New Renaissance, as people like to call it, Disney/Pixar’s trailers were perfectly honest about what their movie was going to be about. I fact, most of them explicitly told the audience what the plot line was, usually by voiceover. They were open about the fact that they were writing musicals (when this applied), they didn’t shy from who the protagonist was, and they were never, ever vague. Even Frozen’s trailer, which focused on humor and action, still explicitly stated what the movie was about. The same could be said for Tangled and The Princess and the Frog, the former of which saw a lot of similar criticism (especially since it did focus so much on Flynn).

So now let’s talk about Brave. It came with a set of trailers that, at their most informative, go past being action-centered to painting Merida as a hero; go out of the way to imply that a war was coming; focus on a witch that shows up for one scene; and give the audience a taste of a world beyond a castle that takes up half of the movie. Say what you want about movies in general, but this is an important change in Disney’s advertising that shouldn’t go ignored. It represents an epitomized realization of Disney’s tactics which now focus specifically on selling to boys, which are apparently the more important demographic now. And unlike Tangled? It wasn’t even backed up with a good movie.

You have to ask yourself why Pixar felt the need to cover up this specific movie’s plot. Why is it that now that we have girls in the leading role, we suddenly need to keep the plot line a secret entirely? You actually said it: because stories centering around women and only women aren’t seen as valuable. It’s consistently seen as a “niche market” and shoved to the side to be straight-to-DVD films. But this is not an excuse. It shows a lack of faith in their own movie, for one, but more importantly it is cowardice. They had so little faith in a female-driven story that they covered it up entirely. They hid it behind the story of a movie that seemed much more interesting to watch. 

So I think OP and everyone else who cared had every right to be disappointed. Because a kick-ass princess saving the world? That would have been bad-ass to watch. But instead we got the same old, tired, faux-feminist story about how women should be allowed to marry when they’re ready and how you shouldn’t take your family for granted. That’s not just ‘trailer vagueness’. That’s outright deceit from a company we’d previously been able to trust.

I never said that it wasn’t problematic: only a reality of the industry. Brave is not the only movie that this has been done to: there are several trailer that mislead the audience purposely in order to sell the product as generally as possible. We’ve discussed before the effects of niche marketing and how it can be harmful, so it’s not that I’m unaware of the issue. In Brave’s case, I could tell that what was being shown wasn’t all that there was to the movie: beware of trailers that just show scenes with voice over rather than a short rundown of the basic narrative. 

Maybe it’s because I wasn’t at all surprised that the movie wasn’t what was shown in the trailer. I’m not saying that they didn’t have a right to be disappointed: I actually take umbridge at their comments on the mother-daughter relationship more than anything else. I wouldn’t call Brave a faux-feminist story by any means (at least compared to Maleficent), but that’s just my opinion. It’s more about getting out of your own way and seeing that your actions have consequence rather than another narrative about a young girl not wanting to get married.

But to my original point: the deception is nothing new, so I really am not going to hold it against the film. I am in no way denying that Brave is a film that’s lacking in it’s narrative. But at the same time, I’m not going to throw it out completely because of a deceptive trailer.

192 notes

New Big Hero 6 footage

(x)

2,225 notes

the-wolfbats:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"I really love GoGo Tomogo’s design for Big Hero 6 and would love to cosplay if I end up loving her character just as much! But I know I’ll be scared to do it since a lot of white cosplayers who have cosplayed outside of their own race get hate for doing so. I don’t understand what’s so wrong with a white girl cosplaying Tiana or a black girl cosplaying Cinderella if they love the characters. "

AS LONG AS YOU DO NOT COLOR YOUR SKIN you can cosplay who you want we do this at least twice a month.
BUT KNOW THIS that there are plenty of characters for white people to cosplay and a minority for people of color.

the-wolfbats:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"I really love GoGo Tomogo’s design for Big Hero 6 and would love to cosplay if I end up loving her character just as much! But I know I’ll be scared to do it since a lot of white cosplayers who have cosplayed outside of their own race get hate for doing so. I don’t understand what’s so wrong with a white girl cosplaying Tiana or a black girl cosplaying Cinderella if they love the characters. "

AS LONG AS YOU DO NOT COLOR YOUR SKIN you can cosplay who you want we do this at least twice a month.

BUT KNOW THIS that there are plenty of characters for white people to cosplay and a minority for people of color.

135 notes

junawashere:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

mich-quiche:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"I was so excited for Brave from the promotional materials. Yay, badass princess on a horse! Yay, badass princess with a bow and arrow! Yay, badass princess who doesn’t get with a dude! It was marketed as an adventure, and instead we got SAPPY MOTHER-DAUGHTER BONDING. Which is fine, but I don’t care about sappy mother-daughter bonding. I wanted a princess kicking ass, and instead I got a whiny brat. I’ve never been more disappointed in a Disney or Pixar film"

Trailers lie. Get over it.
While Brave wasn’t what many expected, it was still valuable. We get Pixar’s first female protagonist: a company that prioritizes story and character has prioritized toys, fish, and robots before a woman. We get a mother-daughter bonding story which is rare in mainstream media as well as animation. We don’t get many narratives where women’s relationships are seen as valuable; the “sappy” mother-daughter bonding is nothing to scoff at. Not to mention it being a narrative where the main character has to take responsibility for their poor decisions as well as having to live up to their responsibilities.
Now, Brave is nowhere near perfect; it’s got its narrative problems as well as having some missed opportunities. But just because you don’t see the value in it doesn’t mean that it isn’t worth watching.

My main problem with Brave’s trailer vs. movie wasn’t the mother-daughter bond, it was the COMPLETE butchering of the tone that it was trying to market. The first few teasers and trailers were showing this mystical, mysterious world full of adventure and magic and (at least I was expecting) possibly dark themes that Pixar can pull off, cause the’ve done it before. Instead, the majority of the movie was silly and fast-paces with a plot that way threadbare and depended on Merida’s absolute stupidity (“I want to change my mom” being the vaguest, most easy-to-interpret phrase she could have possibly said, and everyone in the audience knew that fixing the tapestry was not how the spell was going to break). They tried to include dark, mysterious scenes but they didn’t fit in at all with the movie as a whole, and the “villain” (Mor’du) was….just a bear. No motivation, he just showed up all angry and scary when the climax demanded it.
Basically, my problem is not with the relationships between the characters, but the fact that we could have had a fantasy epic that instead turned into a mess of a movie with no consistency or plot strength. I could go on for a long, long time about how disappointed I was with Brave.

Like I said before, trailers lie. I could tell watching the trailer and clips that they were hiding a lot of the actual story and I can see why. Had they tried to market this movie on the mother-daughter, do you honestly think that people would have gone to see this? Female narratives are very pigeonholed and are given unfair bias by the public. I honestly don’t blame them for manipulating the audience with the trailer they made.
Mor’du isn’t just a bear: several times in the film he serves as Merida’s lesson of why she must change. In the first instance, it’s when Elinor tries to use the story of the ambitious son to teach Merida why duty and responsibility is important. Now, I will agree that Mor’du is more of a MacGuffin rather than a full-fledged villain, but his presence still serves a purpose in the story other than just being scary. 
I would ultimately blame Brave’s narrative problems on a lot of the behind-the-scenes drama. Brenda Chapman, the original director and creator of the movie was removed from the production as it’s director over creative disputes. The story really feels like it went through a couple hands before its completion. As I stated before, while Brave was not what we expected, but we still got some valuable things out of it.

"Trailers lie. Get over it." really? this is the dumbest excuse for a awful movie, the problem isn’t the mother-daughter story, is the terrible way they develop everything, for example the time when merida kicked everyone asses and won her own hand, when i saw this i was OMG!!!  a bunch of hairy men, they are going nuts! a little girl won!!!! …but instead no reaction, NO REACTION, i wanted to watch fighting, danger, darkness, just because is a mother-daughter movie don’t mean soft girly plain boring, the only thing brave about this was release the movie

That’s not an excuse; it’s a fact. Trailers are manufactured to get people to see the movie: they don’t always tell the truth about what’s in it. And, I’m not excusing away the movie’s problems; I’m talking about how the trailer is misleading considering the movie’s real content.
And there was a reaction to Merida’s “shooting for her own hand”: a possible war. Merida’s refusal to pick a suitor is the whole point of the men fighting in this movie (as well as some old rivalries on their part). Also, going back to my original point of trailers lie, when that clip was first released, it was presented out of context, leading the audience to believe this was another story about the empowerment of a young woman: that was a deception.

junawashere:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

mich-quiche:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"I was so excited for Brave from the promotional materials. Yay, badass princess on a horse! Yay, badass princess with a bow and arrow! Yay, badass princess who doesn’t get with a dude! It was marketed as an adventure, and instead we got SAPPY MOTHER-DAUGHTER BONDING. Which is fine, but I don’t care about sappy mother-daughter bonding. I wanted a princess kicking ass, and instead I got a whiny brat. I’ve never been more disappointed in a Disney or Pixar film"

Trailers lie. Get over it.

While Brave wasn’t what many expected, it was still valuable. We get Pixar’s first female protagonist: a company that prioritizes story and character has prioritized toys, fish, and robots before a woman. We get a mother-daughter bonding story which is rare in mainstream media as well as animation. We don’t get many narratives where women’s relationships are seen as valuable; the “sappy” mother-daughter bonding is nothing to scoff at. Not to mention it being a narrative where the main character has to take responsibility for their poor decisions as well as having to live up to their responsibilities.

Now, Brave is nowhere near perfect; it’s got its narrative problems as well as having some missed opportunities. But just because you don’t see the value in it doesn’t mean that it isn’t worth watching.

My main problem with Brave’s trailer vs. movie wasn’t the mother-daughter bond, it was the COMPLETE butchering of the tone that it was trying to market. The first few teasers and trailers were showing this mystical, mysterious world full of adventure and magic and (at least I was expecting) possibly dark themes that Pixar can pull off, cause the’ve done it before. Instead, the majority of the movie was silly and fast-paces with a plot that way threadbare and depended on Merida’s absolute stupidity (“I want to change my mom” being the vaguest, most easy-to-interpret phrase she could have possibly said, and everyone in the audience knew that fixing the tapestry was not how the spell was going to break). They tried to include dark, mysterious scenes but they didn’t fit in at all with the movie as a whole, and the “villain” (Mor’du) was….just a bear. No motivation, he just showed up all angry and scary when the climax demanded it.

Basically, my problem is not with the relationships between the characters, but the fact that we could have had a fantasy epic that instead turned into a mess of a movie with no consistency or plot strength. I could go on for a long, long time about how disappointed I was with Brave.

Like I said before, trailers lie. I could tell watching the trailer and clips that they were hiding a lot of the actual story and I can see why. Had they tried to market this movie on the mother-daughter, do you honestly think that people would have gone to see this? Female narratives are very pigeonholed and are given unfair bias by the public. I honestly don’t blame them for manipulating the audience with the trailer they made.

Mor’du isn’t just a bear: several times in the film he serves as Merida’s lesson of why she must change. In the first instance, it’s when Elinor tries to use the story of the ambitious son to teach Merida why duty and responsibility is important. Now, I will agree that Mor’du is more of a MacGuffin rather than a full-fledged villain, but his presence still serves a purpose in the story other than just being scary. 

I would ultimately blame Brave’s narrative problems on a lot of the behind-the-scenes drama. Brenda Chapman, the original director and creator of the movie was removed from the production as it’s director over creative disputes. The story really feels like it went through a couple hands before its completion. As I stated before, while Brave was not what we expected, but we still got some valuable things out of it.

"Trailers lie. Get over it." really? this is the dumbest excuse for a awful movie, the problem isn’t the mother-daughter story, is the terrible way they develop everything, for example the time when merida kicked everyone asses and won her own hand, when i saw this i was OMG!!!  a bunch of hairy men, they are going nuts! a little girl won!!!! …but instead no reaction, NO REACTION, i wanted to watch fighting, danger, darkness, just because is a mother-daughter movie don’t mean soft girly plain boring, the only thing brave about this was release the movie

That’s not an excuse; it’s a fact. Trailers are manufactured to get people to see the movie: they don’t always tell the truth about what’s in it. And, I’m not excusing away the movie’s problems; I’m talking about how the trailer is misleading considering the movie’s real content.

And there was a reaction to Merida’s “shooting for her own hand”: a possible war. Merida’s refusal to pick a suitor is the whole point of the men fighting in this movie (as well as some old rivalries on their part). Also, going back to my original point of trailers lie, when that clip was first released, it was presented out of context, leading the audience to believe this was another story about the empowerment of a young woman: that was a deception.

192 notes

hot4triangle:

kyrianne:

thatemilyperson:

kyrianne:

I am not okay with the lack of continuity for Goofy’s real name

image

I don’t know what I was expecting, but this is bullshit.

I AM NOT OKAY WITH THE LACK OF CONTINUITY

goofy changes his name ever few years for the purpose of tax evasion, he has been dodging the government for well over half a century and owes hardworking american citizens hundreds of thousands of dollars in back taxes

19,158 notes

waltdisneyconfessions:

“TRIGGER WARNING: It’s been a month since I last cut. For the first time in a two years I have my arms on show. Frozen has helped me as I can relate with Elsa and her gloves.People like Hans betray her and Anna stress her out but in the end she doesn’t need to hide her powers, so for that, Frozen means a lot to me”

waltdisneyconfessions:

TRIGGER WARNING: It’s been a month since I last cut. For the first time in a two years I have my arms on show. Frozen has helped me as I can relate with Elsa and her gloves.People like Hans betray her and Anna stress her out but in the end she doesn’t need to hide her powers, so for that, Frozen means a lot to me”

118 notes